Your cart is currently empty.

Hike, Kayak, Camp, Repeat

Make a long weekend memorable by blending hiking and kayaking with your next camping trip. Nature is calling!

Getting out for a long weekend in nature is one of the most rejuvenating experiences we can have. Done with family or friends, you’re in for a memorable experience and - potentially - a new pastime.

Different regions may have different features that attract us. Be it the change of colors in the northeast or the more rugged landscape of the west, nature definitely calls us to partake of her wonders. That’s why a camping getaway, combined with kayaking and hiking, can be a great way to shrug off the grind and really immerse in our natural surroundings.
Kayak Camping with Oru Kayak
If you’ve ever camped, you already have the basic skills to get started. And, since Oru Kayak’s models are all super lightweight and easily packable, you can get to your perfect destination without a lot of hassle.

The rewards are numerous: Spending a night under the stars, hiking through new and beautiful places and enjoying a day trip out on the water. They all come together to satisfy the explorer inside of you.

As with any outbound adventure, a bit of prior planning can make your trip more successful, comfortable and enjoyable. Here’s a few things to consider, if you’re a first-timer.

Essential Gear
- First aid kit
Make sure you have a first aid kit, stocked with bandages, disinfectant and other essential care items.

- Camping stove and cooking gear
If you plan to cook, a campfire can do the trick. If you’re not sure of your fire starting skills, a small LP stove works well.

- Rain wear
Even if the forecast is clear and fine, it makes sense to pack a rain poncho.

- Hiking boots and wet shoes
A good pair of hiking boots is an invaluable piece of camping gear. And, wet shoes for in and around your kayak will keep you comfy and warm.

- Snacks high in protein (trail mix, nuts)
Hiking and kayaking can take it out of you, if you’re going for the gusto. High-protein snacks are just the ticket for keeping your energy up.

- Water bottles
Hydration is always important when exerting. Be sure to have plenty of fresh water for kayaking, hiking and at the campsite.

- Fishing gear (optional)
What’s better than a freshly landed fish cooked over an open fire? If you plan on fishing, take inventory of your gear before heading out.

- Animal repellent
No matter how careful you are, critters will likely be lured by your food supply. Solar-powered ultrasonic repellents work quite well and are more humane than sprays.

Where to Go
Consult with the national park authority in your country. Many have guides to individual parks online and can advise on the best ones for camping and kayaking. If there are entry fees associated with overnight stays, these guides will let you know how much and during which seasons fees are in effect.

The best places will be those with low to moderate elevation gains and well-defined trails. This makes it easier to carry your gear as well as your kayak.
Hiking with Oru Kayak
There are salt and freshwater opportunities virtually everywhere, so doing some research can help you plan like a pro. It’s also good to know dry and rainy seasons for the location you select.

Going Your Own Way
A long weekend of kayaking, hiking and camping can be as rigorous or relaxing as you like. Some people enjoy an invigorating and challenging adventure while others revel in soaking up the silence and scenery. There really are no set rules. The most important part is making your outing your own, unique and enjoyable experience. So, go crazy or be lazy. It’s your call.

Oru Kayak offers a full range of folding origami kayaks for every level of skill. Check them out here.